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Your state-by-state US eBike guide

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Your state-by-state

Every state has different thoughts on eBikes. Some think they’re the same as regular bicycles, some qualify them as mopeds. The truth is, you can’t ride safely on your eBike if you do it without regarding local laws and restrictions. That doesn’t mean you can’t go on a proper eBike road trip, though ‒ you just have to keep in mind local laws along your route and play by those rules. Some states might require you to carry your driver’s license, but don’t need you to have your eBike registered, and some states have a vice-versa situation. When you’re on the road, these things matter.

Also, you’ll find that you need this kind of information when your shiny new TOP 3.0 is finally delivered ‒ you need to know state eBike laws and regulations to ride your new eBike freely.

This guide is kind of essential: we break down eBike laws for every state in alphabetical order. You’ll learn everything: registration, age restrictions, road restrictions. Power up and let’s dive into it!

Alabama

We’ll start with the eBike definition and what does it mean traffic-wise. In this state, electric bicycles are, technically and legally, motor-driven cycles. This means that eBike drivers don’t have to stick to the road rules for regular bicycles.
What about license and registration? In Alabama, you as an eBike operator have to carry an operator’s license, and your eBike has to meet registration requirements for this state. You also must be 14 and older to ride this kind of vehicle and wear a helmet.
As for your rides in Alabama, you can drive on roads, but not on sidewalks and bike paths.

Alaska

Electric bicycles in Alaska are also taken as motor-driven cycles, applying that they are not subject to the same rules as regular bikes. Just like with the previous case, you must meet the state’s requirements for vehicle registration and carry operator’s license. You also have to wear a helmet and be 14 or older to ride an eBike.
In Alaska, you are permitted to drive your eBike only on roads.

Arizona

Arizona treats eBikes the same as regular bicycles, meaning that electric bikes must follow the same rules. In this state, universal eBike classification is implied from Class 1 to Class 3.
You don’t have to carry an operator’s license or register your eBike in Arizona. You also don’t have to wear a helmet there (but we strongly advise you to do so). No age restrictions are applied.
You can ride your eBike in Arizona on sidewalks and bikeways as well as on roads. Be aware that local authorities can apply their own restrictions, so your best shot would be to check with the eBike laws of the city or county you’re driving in.

Arkansas

Arkansas also treats eBikes the same way as Arizona does, meaning there’s no legal difference between regular and electric bikes. Licensing and registration rules are also the same, and eBike classification is also intact.
As for helmets, you must wear them if you’re under 21 and driving a Class 3 eBike. You can’t also drive Class 3 eBike if you’re under 17.
Local authorities can apply their own driving restrictions for eBikes, so we advise you to check with the eBike laws of the town, city, or county you’re driving in.

California

Cali is probably the most eBike-friendly state of all the US. Electric bikes are legally similar to regular bikes without needing a registration or driver’s license.
You can’t drive a Class 3 eBike without your helmet on, though. Anyone under 16 can’t drive a Class 3 eBike.
As for driving restrictions, each town or county, and even National Parks can have their own, meaning you better check with local authorities on that ‒ especially if you’re about to take a ride to a National Park. Read more about Top-10 best California routes to ride your E-Bike and best places to ride in California.

Colorado

This state basically copies eBike rules from Arkansas ones. Just make sure you’re wearing a helmet for your own safety and get assistance from local transport authorities to learn if there are any eBike restrictions in the specific city or county.

Connecticut

Connecticut also treats electric bikes as regular ones: no registration or driver’s license, no road restrictions on main.
Every eBike driver in Connecticut must wear a helmet, and everyone under 16 can’t drive a Class 3 eBike.
Driving restrictions apply mostly to Class 3 eBikes ‒ you can’t drive them on bikes or multi-use paths and trails. Local restrictions might also be in place.

Delaware

Delaware doesn’t recognize universal eBike classification, although it considers electric bikes with motors under 750W and a maximum speed of 20MPH a regular bicycle. Basically, Class 1 and Class 2 eBikes are considered regular bicycles in Delaware.
You don’t have to register your eBike there or carry an operator’s license. All eBike drivers and their passengers under 18 have to wear helmets.
In Delaware, you can drive your eBike on sidewalks and bike paths.

Florida

Florida views electric vehicles that can be operated by human effort with a maximum speed of 20MPH as bicycles. Your Class 2 eBike is a bicycle there, meaning you don’t need registration or a license to operate it. You also have to be 16 or older to drive an eBike.
You also have to wear a helmet during your rides. You can’t drive your eBike on sidewalks, but you can do it on roads and on bike paths (but only if you don’t use a pedal-assist system or a throttle).

Georgia

Electric bicycles are treated the same as regular ones. They don’t need a registration or for you to carry a license.
Everyone including passengers on a Class 3 eBike has to wear a helmet, and only people over 15 can drive this class of vehicles.
Also, Class 3 eBikes are forbidden on multi-use paths and bike paths with a few exceptions: 

  1. If the path is bordering a roadway or a highway;
  2. If this is specifically allowed by the local transport authority.

Hawaii

Electric bikes there are described as low-speed electric bicycles ‒ your eBike has to have a maximum speed of 20MPH while being powered only by a motor to comply with this definition.
You as an eBike owner have to pay a $30 fee to register your eBike ‒ everyone aged 18 or older has to do this. If you’re 16 or younger, you have to wear a helmet while driving.
The good news is, you can drive your eBike everywhere in Hawaii, including bike paths.

Idaho

In Idaho, electric bicycles are treated the same as regular ones. They don’t need a registration or for you to carry a license.
You can drive your eBike on bike paths, but beware of local regulations for motor use on bike paths ‒ won’t hurt to check with local authorities on this.

Illinois

EBikes are viewed as low-speed electric bicycles and don’t need either registration or licensing.
Driving electric bikes is allowed on bike paths and roads, but is forbidden on sidewalks. Local restrictions might apply, though.

Indiana

Electric bikes in Indiana are legally similar to regular bikes without needing a registration or driver’s license.
Everyone under 18 including passengers on Class 3 eBikes has to wear a helmet. You can drive a Class 3 electric bike starting from the age of 15.
You can’t drive your Class 3 eBike in Indiana on trails, bike paths, and multi-use paths unless they border highways or roadways. Class 2 bikes can drive everywhere unless stated otherwise by the local law.

Iowa

Everything that has Class 2 eBike properties (a motor under 750W and a maximum speed of 20 MPH) is viewed as a regular bicycle and has the same legal regulations. You don’t have to register your eBike or carry a driver’s license.
Iowa imposes no age restrictions or helmet laws, but we strongly advise you to wear a helmet for your own safety. You can’t drive your eBike on sidewalks or bike paths.

Kansas

Kansas views eBikes with a motor under 1000W and a maximum speed of 20MPH as electric-assisted bicycles ‒ they have the same rules as regular bikes. You don’t need either registration or a license.
Kansas imposes no helmet requirements and no age restrictions. You can’t ride your electric bike on sidewalks and bike paths, though.

Kentucky

If your eBike can be operated with human effort and motor power, it’s technically still a bicycle in Kentucky. There are no age and helmet restrictions or licensing requirements.
In Kentucky, you can drive your eBike also on sidewalks and bike paths.

Louisiana

If your eBike can reach a maximum speed of 25 mph, it’s considered a motorized bicycle.
You have to carry an operator’s license and register your electric bike in Louisiana. A helmet is required, and you have to be 15 or older to drive an eBike.
You can’t drive your eBike on sidewalks, and local authorities can impose restrictions for motor use on bike paths.

Maine

Maine accepts three eBike classes and views electric bikes as equal to regular bicycles.
You don’t need licensing or registration to drive there. All eBike drivers and passengers under 16 must wear helmets. Also, Class 2 and Class 3 eBikes are prohibited from being driven by people under 16.
You can’t drive a Class 3 eBike on a bike path unless it borders a highway or a roadway, or when Class 3 driving is locally allowed.

Maryland

There’s no difference in Maryland laws between eBikes and regular ones. You don’t need a license or registration.
You can’t drive Class 3 eBike on a bike path unless it’s allowed by local government or unless the bike path is bordering a highway or roadway. You can also drive your eBike on sidewalks.

Massachusetts

An electric bike is viewed as a motorized bicycle if it doesn’t exceed a maximum speed of 25 MPH. 
You need an operator’s license, though, and your eBike can be subject to registration.
A helmet is required for everyone, and you have to be at least 16 to drive an eBike. You can’t drive your eBike on a sidewalk or a bike path.

Michigan

EBikes in Michigan are treated the same as regular ones. 
You don’t need registration or licensing, but you’ll need a permit to ride an eBike in National Parks.
Everyone under 18 must wear helmets, and no one under 14 is allowed to operate a Class 3 eBike.
Class 1 eBikes are allowed on bike paths, but Class 2 and Class 3 are not unless it’s specified by local authorities.

Minnesota

Electric bikes are viewed there as electric-assisted bicycles ‒ only if their motors are under 1000W and the maximum speed is 20MPH. No registration, licensing, or helmets use is required. EBike drivers have to be at least 15 years old.
You can’t drive your eBike on sidewalks and bike paths.

Mississippi

This state view eBikes as bicycles with motors attached. There is also no age restriction, no requirements for helmet use, licensing, or registration.
EBikes are allowed on bike paths and sidewalks unless stated otherwise by local transport authorities.

Missouri

Electric bikes are viewed as motorized bicycles if they have a maximum speed of 30MPH. 
You need an operator’s license, but registration is not required. Helmets are not required but highly recommended, and you have to be at least 16 to drive an eBike.
Electric bikes in Missouri are prohibited on sidewalks, but with bike paths, it’s all up to the local government.

Montana

Electric bikes are viewed there as electric-assisted bicycles if they have a maximum speed of 20MPH. There are no age restrictions, no licensing, registration, or helmet use requirements. 
EBikes are allowed on sidewalks and bike paths.

Nebraska

Electric bikes are viewed there as electric-assisted bicycles if they have a maximum speed of 20MPH and a motor under 750W. There are no age restrictions, no licensing, registration, or helmet use requirements. 
You can’t drive your eBike on sidewalks and bike paths.

Nevada

An electric bicycle in Nevada can be called that only if it has a motor under 750W and a maximum speed of 20MPH. There are no age restrictions, no licensing, registration, or helmet use requirements. 
You can’t drive your eBike on sidewalks, but bike paths are all yours.

New Hampshire

EBikes in New Hampshire are treated the same as regular ones. 
You don’t need registration or licensing to drive your eBike there, but everyone on Class 3 eBikes under 18 have to wear a helmet. Also, you can drive a Class 3 eBike only if you’re 16 or older.
Class 1 and Class 2 eBikes are allowed on bike paths and multi-use paths. Class 3 eBikes are permitted only on roadways.

New Jersey

EBikes there are viewed as low-speed electric bicycles and don’t need either registration or licensing. Class 3 eBikes are legally not represented, but Class 1 and Class 2 eBikes are.
Electric bikes are permitted on bike paths but forbidden to drive on sidewalks unless stated otherwise by the local government.

New Mexico

EBikes in New Mexico are viewed as mopeds and thus need the same licensing and registration. You have to be at least 15 to operate an eBike there.
Electric bikes are forbidden from driving on sidewalks.

New York

New York sees eBikes as motor-driven cycles, meaning they fall under the rules of other motor vehicles.
But here’s the catch: NY DMV doesn’t legally consider eBikes to be vehicles, so you don’t have to have any license or registration.
You can also drive your eBike everywhere where public motor vehicles are allowed.

North Carolina

North Carolina views eBikes with a motor under 1000W and a maximum speed of 20MPH as electric-assisted bicycles ‒ they have the same rules as regular bikes. You don’t need either registration or a license.
Helmets are also not required, but you have to be at least 16 to operate an eBike.
You can drive your eBike on sidewalks where it’s allowed for bicycles, and bike paths are not mentioned in the law ‒ to make sure if you can go there, contact local authorities.

North Dakota

An electric bike is viewed as a motorized bicycle in North Dakota. This means you have to insure and register your eBike as well as carry your operator’s license. Also, you have to be at least 14 to drive an eBike.
You can’t drive your eBike on sidewalks, and for bike paths, we advise you to consult local authorities as bike paths are not mentioned in the law.

Ohio

An electric bicycle in Ohio is called exactly that.
You don't need a license or registration to operate an eBike there.
Everyone on Class 3 eBike has to wear a helmet, including passengers. You can drive your electric bike on bike paths, but be aware of local restrictions that might apply.

Oklahoma

EBikes in Oklahoma are viewed and treated the same as regular ones. 
You don’t need registration or licensing to drive your eBike there, but you have to be at least 16 to ride your Class 3 eBike.
Class 3 electric bikes in Oklahoma are forbidden on bike paths and multi-use paths unless they're bordering highways or roadways.

Oregon

Oregon sees eBikes with a motor under 1000W and a maximum speed of 20MPH as electric-assisted bicycles ‒ they have the same rules as regular bikes. You also don't have to have an operator's license or registration.
All riders have to be at least 16 years old. You can drive on bike paths, but not on sidewalks.

Pennsylvania

In Pennsylvania, eBikes are considered pedal cycles with electric assist if their motors are under 750W and have a maximum speed of 20 MPH by motor power and if they weigh no more than 100 pounds. 
You don't need any licensing or registration for eBikes in this state.

Rhode Island

In this state, if your eBike has a maximum of 1491W of motor power and a maximum speed of 25 MPH, it's considered an electric motorized bicycle. You don't need any licensing or registration for eBikes, and helmet rules are not mentioned in the law.
You can ride eBikes in Rhode Island everywhere where the local law doesn't forbid it.

South Carolina

There's no definition for eBikes in this state, so the laws for other vehicles apply to eBikes, too.
EBikes with 750W motors are the only exception from the mopeds category, meaning they don't need any licensing or registration.
The state doesn't specify road restrictions for eBikes.

South Dakota

EBikes are defined as electric bicycles and follow the same rules developed for regular bikes.
You don't have to carry a license or register your eBike in South Dakota, but you have to be at least 16 to drive a Class 3 eBike.
As for road restrictions, Class 1 and Class 2 eBikes are allowed on bike paths and multi-use paths. Class 3 eBikes are permitted only on roadways.

Tennessee

EBikes in this state are defined as electric bicycles and follow the same rules developed for regular bikes. You don't need any licensing or registration to drive an eBike in this state.
Everyone including passengers on Class 3 eBikes must wear helmets, and drivers of Class 3 eBikes have to be at least 14 years old.
You can't drive your eBike on sidewalks, but Class 1 and Class 2 electric bikes are allowed on bike paths unless stated otherwise by local law.

Texas

Texas views eBikes the same as regular bicycles, meaning that electric bikes must follow the same rules. The universal eBike classification also applies in this state. You don't have to register your eBike or have a license, but for Class 3 eBikes you have to be at least 15 to drive.
As for road restrictions, it's all up to local regulations, so we advise you to check with local authorities.

Utah

Utah considers eBikes the same as regular bicycles, meaning that electric bikes must follow the same rules. The universal eBike classification also applies in this state. You don't have to register your eBike or have a license to drive legally in this state.
You can drive on bike paths, but not on sidewalks.

Vermont

In Vermont, eBikes are considered motor-assisted bicycles and follow the same rules for regular bikes, if their motors are under 1000W and have a maximum speed of 20 MPH. You don't have to register your eBike or carry a license for these vehicles, though.
You can't operate your eBike on sidewalks, but for bike paths the rules are unclear, so we suggest you check with local authorities.

Virginia

EBikes in Virginia are called electric power-assisted bicycles. You can't drive at a speed higher than 25 MPH, though.
As for licensing and registration, you don't need any of these in Virginia. You also aren't required to wear a helmet (but we strongly recommend doing so), but eBike drivers have to be at least 14 years old.
You can ride both on Virginian sidewalks and bike paths.

Washington

Washington considers eBikes the same as regular bicycles, meaning that electric bikes must follow the same rules. The eBike classification also applies in this state. You don't have to register your eBike or have a license to drive legally in this state.
Class 1 and Class 2 eBikes are permitted on bike paths, but Class 3 eBikes are forbidden there unless stated otherwise by local authorities.
You also have to be at least 16 to operate an eBike.

West Virginia

EBikes in West Virginia are seen as mopeds and need the same licensing and registration as mopeds do.
Operators have to be at least 15 years old, and they must wear helmets during the ride.
Driving eBikes in this state is forbidden on sidewalks.

Wisconsin

In Wisconsin, eBikes are considered motor bicycles if their motors are under 750W and have a maximum speed of 20 MPH. You must have a valid license to operate an eBike there, have your eBike registered, and be at least 16. The helmet is not required by state law.
You can't drive your eBike on bike paths, and sidewalk regulations vary from city to city.

Wyoming

Wyoming acknowledges eBikes and equals them to regular bicycles. The eBike classification is also present in state law. You don't have to register your eBike or have a license to operate an eBike.
EBikes of every class are permitted to drive on bike paths, but local authorities can redirect the use of motors on these paths.

As you can see, some states share completely the same rules for eBikes while others are really specific. Our best advice is to always check with local transport authorities and stick to personal safety rules. 

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